If a programmer walked into an interview and gave answers this evasive about how many projects he’d done in Java, he’d be an obvious no-hire.Not having certain experience is one thing; not even knowing what experience you have is another matter entirely.When Apple made a phone, it turned out it wasn’t really competing in the handset business; it was competing for the next dominant personal computing platform.

In that sense it might be more of a long-term competitor to the Amazon Echo (and whatever Android variant Google is pitching at the same space) than to Tesla’s cars. Three points for clarification: The old “What if they hired carpenters they way they hire programmers?

From this perspective, maybe the thing that’s kept the Apple TV on hold for so long is that they were trying to go down this road, but they kept failing to pull it off (to their standards) in the living room. ” joke/commentary didn’t sit right with me the first time I read it, and after stumbling across it again I now see why.

Given all of the above, the true subtext of this “joke” is that calling yourself a programmer entitles you to a job.

But the really galling part is that the “calling yourself a programmer” bit .

If learning this stuff is so easy, then I’d rather hire someone who understands what the goal is of finish carpentry.

And ideally someone who showed some interest in the project and the skills required to do it, not just the job.

There’s always a terrific slight of hand going on when software developers try to draw analogies to other fields.

Blue-collar credentials and being treated like a unique, creative, and highly-paid professional just aren’t compatible.

The main premise of this complaint about programming interviews is that a programmer is a programmer is a programmer, and the details don’t matter, and that’s straight-up bullshit. If the overall software system will be distributed, then the architecture needs to take rollout into consideration.