Ada has immersed herself into Chinese culture mastering the language and living well in her adopted home of Beijing.She is one shining example of out of the box thinking and taking a chance on love. Podcast interview with Interracial Marriage and Family founder Lorraine Spencer and how it all started. Barbara Nguyen, a public relations representative whose fiance is of Caucasian and Guatemalan heritage, has mostly dated Caucasian men, she said.

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The nuances and repercussions of that discussion extend farther than the way in which Caucasians view Asians, with many Asian Americans citing those same stereotypes as having shaped their own sexual preferences and the confidence in which they pursue or don't pursue partners of other races.

The history of interracial marriage in the US has long been complicated.

When PBS recently aired Seeking Asian Female, a documentary about a "mail-order" marriage initiated on the Internet between a middle-aged Caucasian man and a young Chinese mainland woman, the resulting media coverage sparked a heated online debate among critics and viewers about sexual fetishes, racial power dynamics, and what the motivations behind a pairing might be.

Several critiques of the film quoted Goal Auzeen Saedi, a post-doctoral fellow in counseling at Stanford University, who believes that such pairings send an "underlying message about power, dominance and white privilege".

Later, World War II sparked a wave of "war bride" marriages, in which thousands of women from China, Japan and other Asian countries arrived in the US to join white partners.

Even so, interracial marriage remained illegal in 38 states until 1967, when the US Supreme Court ruled that anti-miscegenation laws were unconstitutional.

Additionally, Asian women have been quick to label such men as perverse when their own preferences for white men have made the pairings possible in the first place, she wrote.

She cited a study conducted by the dating site Coffee Meets Bagel, in which data showed that of those who specified a racial preference in potential partners, 7 percent of white men indicated Asian.

Barbara Nguyen and James Willeford say they have faced minimal resistance for their interracial relationship in New York, but believe that attitudes are different outside major metropolitan cities.